Swabian special dishes

The best dishes from Burhan’s Swabian kitchen

Maultaschen

A “Tasche“ is a bag or pocket. Among Swabian natives “Maul“, the German word for muzzle, is a socially acceptable description for mouth. A Maultasche is not simply a Swabian type of flat pasta, but it is a piece of dough that has been lovingly filled with finest ingredients such as minced meat, spinach, bread crumbs and onions, flavoured with various herbs and spices.

Where and when Maultasche was conceived and for what purpose? A vile explanation states that it is merely one of the numerous Swabian examples for using up leftovers, following the well-known theme “Bei uns verkommt nix!“ (“We won’t let anything go to waste!“). Another popular story relates Maultaschen to the “green“ foods that used to be traditionally prepared on Maundy Thursday, in German on “Gründonnerstag” (Green Thursday), and that got eaten on Good Friday. Today, the dish asserts itself as an integral part of the menu of all Swabian restaurants.

Maultaschen

Maultaschen

A “Tasche“ is a bag or pocket. Among Swabian natives “Maul“, the German word for muzzle, is a socially acceptable description for mouth. A Maultasche is not simply a Swabian type of flat pasta, but it is a piece of dough that has been lovingly filled with finest ingredients such as minced meat, spinach, bread crumbs and onions, flavoured with various herbs and spices.

Where and when Maultasche was conceived and for what purpose? A vile explanation states that it is merely one of the numerous Swabian examples for using up leftovers, following the well-known theme “Bei uns verkommt nix!“ (“We won’t let anything go to waste!“). Another popular story relates Maultaschen to the “green“ foods that used to be traditionally prepared on Maundy Thursday, in German on “Gründonnerstag” (Green Thursday), and that got eaten on Good Friday. Today, the dish asserts itself as an integral part of the menu of all Swabian restaurants.

Spätzle

Spätzle – a term generally attributed to the Swabian diminutive of ‘Spatz’, i.e. little sparrow or also used as a nickname for the beloved partner – are egg noodles of soft texture. They typically accompany meat dishes prepared with an abundant sauce or gravy, but they can also take on the leading role – such as in the Cheese Spätzle where they are accompanied often by a delicious Alpine cheese.

Basic Spätzle dough consists of flour, eggs, salt and water. Unlike the dough of German noodles, it is not left to dry but is shaped and dropped into boiling water while still being soft. Traditionally, Spätzle is made by either scraping the thick dough off a wooden board into the water or they are formed by hand or with a spoon – resulting in various shapes ranging from ‘small sparrows’ to ‘small buttons’, a more compact variety.

Spätzle

Spätzle

Spätzle – a term generally attributed to the Swabian diminutive of ‘Spatz’, i.e. little sparrow or also used as a nickname for the beloved partner – are egg noodles of soft texture. They typically accompany meat dishes prepared with an abundant sauce or gravy, but they can also take on the leading role – such as in the Cheese Spätzle where they are accompanied often by a delicious Alpine cheese.

Basic Spätzle dough consists of flour, eggs, salt and water. Unlike the dough of German noodles, it is not left to dry but is shaped and dropped into boiling water while still being soft. Traditionally, Spätzle is made by either scraping the thick dough off a wooden board into the water or they are formed by hand or with a spoon – resulting in various shapes ranging from ‘small sparrows’ to ‘small buttons’, a more compact variety.

Zwiebelrostbraten

Not only popular in Swabia but also in Austria, this dish might not exactly roll off your tongue, but it will melt in your mouth! The name means “roast beef with onions” and consists of a sirloin steak and a sauce with roasted onions and often red wine. In Swabia, it’s served most of the times with the famous Swabian pasta “Spätzle”.

Zwiebelrostbraten

Zwiebelrostbraten

Not only popular in Swabia but also in Austria, this dish might not exactly roll off your tongue, but it will melt in your mouth! The name means “roast beef with onions” and consists of a sirloin steak and a sauce with roasted onions and often red wine. In Swabia, it’s served most of the times with the famous Swabian pasta “Spätzle”.

Kartoffelsalat

The secret of a good potato salad can only be learned by observation and years of practice. The basic ingredients seem quite straightforward: potatoes, an onion, vinegar, oil, salt, pepper and hot broth. But: which potatoes are best? How long do they need to cook? How cold can they be when they are peeled? In what quantities and in what order should the other ingredients be added? How do you fold the sauce gently, but also risky and evenly on the potatoes? And above all: How firm and moist should a real potato salad feel in the mouth? The locals say nothing; they just keep on making it.

Potato salad usually makes its big entrance as a star performer, alongside the obligatory mixed salad, to accompany meat dishes during a traditional Sunday lunch. But it is also often served with sausages. For a truly traditional dish, the salad is served as the only accompaniment to a real Viennese Schnitzel made of thinly-beaten veal.

Kartoffelsalat

Kartoffelsalat

The secret of a good potato salad can only be learned by observation and years of practice. The basic ingredients seem quite straightforward: potatoes, an onion, vinegar, oil, salt, pepper and hot broth. But: which potatoes are best? How long do they need to cook? How cold can they be when they are peeled? In what quantities and in what order should the other ingredients be added? How do you fold the sauce gently, but also risky and evenly on the potatoes? And above all: How firm and moist should a real potato salad feel in the mouth? The locals say nothing; they just keep on making it.

Potato salad usually makes its big entrance as a star performer, alongside the obligatory mixed salad, to accompany meat dishes during a traditional Sunday lunch. But it is also often served with sausages. For a truly traditional dish, the salad is served as the only accompaniment to a real Viennese Schnitzel made of thinly-beaten veal.

Flädlesuppe

Pancakes in a soup? Wait a minute, you might be thinking. Well, yes. In the region of Swabia, the “Flädle”-soup has been a traditional plate from the early ages. And that is not only due to the easiness of preparation but also because of its taste and light consistency. The word Flädle refers to the thin crepe-like pancakes. Before putting them into the light clear broth, the cook has to first roll them up tightly and then slice them into strips. This soup is traditionally eaten as a first course during lunch.

Flädlesuppe

Flädlesuppe

Pancakes in a soup? Wait a minute, you might be thinking. Well, yes. In the region of Swabia, the “Flädle”-soup has been a traditional plate from the early ages. And that is not only due to the easiness of preparation but also because of its taste and light consistency. The word Flädle refers to the thin crepe-like pancakes. Before putting them into the light clear broth, the cook has to first roll them up tightly and then slice them into strips. This soup is traditionally eaten as a first course during lunch.

Lammhaxe

The German kitchen is not known for lamb dishes. That is why the lamb “Haxe” – the thigh of the animal – can only be found in certain regions of Germany and in particular restaurants. In Swabia, the Lammhaxe counts among the most popular meat dishes. Still, this doesn’t make it easy to prepare. You, first of all, need a good juicy piece of meat. That is a crucial requirement. The meat is spiced with pepper, salt, paprika powder and garlic, then put in a casserole in the oven with vegetables and doused with broth. It is important to cover everything up with aluminum foil, so the taste can unfold. Now the waiting begins. After up to one and a half hours, the meat should be coated with butter, so the skin will get crispy. As a side dish potatoes, roast potatoes and green beans are usually served.

The preparation of the Lammhaxe requires patience. But if you ask your Swabian guests after picking up the empty dishes from their table, they will definitely demonstrate to you that your and their waiting was worth it.

Lammhaxe

Lammhaxe

The German kitchen is not known for lamb dishes. That is why the lamb “Haxe” – the thigh of the animal – can only be found in certain regions of Germany and in particular restaurants. In Swabia, the Lammhaxe counts among the most popular meat dishes. Still, this doesn’t make it easy to prepare. You, first of all, need a good juicy piece of meat. That is a crucial requirement. The meat is spiced with pepper, salt, paprika powder and garlic, then put in a casserole in the oven with vegetables and doused with broth. It is important to cover everything up with aluminum foil, so the taste can unfold. Now the waiting begins. After up to one and a half hours, the meat should be coated with butter, so the skin will get crispy. As a side dish potatoes, roast potatoes and green beans are usually served.

The preparation of the Lammhaxe requires patience. But if you ask your Swabian guests after picking up the empty dishes from their table, they will definitely demonstrate to you that your and their waiting was worth it.

Ofenschlupfer

This Swabian dessert is a delicacy with a long tradition. Again, what defines this dish is the motto of the region “We won’t let anything go to waste!“. Slightly stale milk rolls, apples and sultanas are the most important ingredients alongside the eggs, milk and sugar every household has. The rolls and the apples are sliced and put in layers in a baking dish and sprinkled with cinnamon and sultanas. Above this masterpiece, the sauce of eggs, milk, vanilla sugar and sugar is added and then everything is placed in the oven. If there should be leftovers, they taste good with ice cream.

Ofenschlupfer

Ofenschlupfer

This Swabian dessert is a delicacy with a long tradition. Again, what defines this dish is the motto of the region “We won’t let anything go to waste!“. Slightly stale milk rolls, apples and sultanas are the most important ingredients alongside the eggs, milk and sugar every household has. The rolls and the apples are sliced and put in layers in a baking dish and sprinkled with cinnamon and sultanas. Above this masterpiece, the sauce of eggs, milk, vanilla sugar and sugar is added and then everything is placed in the oven. If there should be leftovers, they taste good with ice cream.

Linsen & Spätzle

Another famous meal in the Swabian kitchen are lentils accompanied by Spätzle and also string sausages. The common recipe goes like this: the lentils are soaked in water over night and boiled in broth with onion and bacon. The preparation process depends on the cook, though. Sometimes also carrots and potatoes are boiled together with the lentils. But the most important ingredient comes at the very end, shortly before the dish reaches the table. Don’t forget to put vinegar and mustard on the table if you want to please your Swabian guests!

Apfelküchle

Germany is a country that has almost all year long fruit heavy apple trees. No wonder that apples are found in every second to third sweet pastry. In certain regions and kitchens, apples are also used to stuff pork or goose or in the sauces that accompany meat dishes.

A famous sweet pastry in Swabia is the so-called Apfelküchle – the small apple cakes. Those small cakes as they are called have made their way up to the USA and are similar to the there known apple fritter. The difference lays, though, in the preparation: the Apfelküchle are pancakes that are filled with slices of apples, cinnamon and sugar. Fried in plenty of oil from both sides, they should be nicely browned. The Apfelküchle can be prepared in numerous different ways. But they are always served warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream and some whipped cream. Should ice cream be out of season, one can also serve the small cakes with custard.